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Harvard cùng MIT phát triển mực xăm sinh học thông minh, hiển thị tình trạng sức khỏe ngay trên da

Researchers at the College of Medicine have teamed up with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop a bio-tattoo ink project. Smart has the ability to change colors based on the user's body condition. It is composed of reactants that change the concentration of sodium, glucose in the interstitial fluid (the liquid part outside the cell), the method of using new ink has both visual results, long-term, has eliminated the use of electronic devices on the body and overcome many other disadvantages. The project was named "", led by Dr. Ali Yetisen, posdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital; Dr. Nan Jiang, posdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women Hospital; and other MIT Media Lab colleagues represented by Katia Vega. "We question whether the technology behind the wearer will be what?" Said Ali Yetisen. "So we came up with the idea of ​​integrating biological sensors into the cuticle." He said the downside of current health devices is that they are not perfectly aligned with the body (for example, the smart meter that monitors the heart rate through the eye), not to mention the battery life. The term also depends on the wireless connection to a primary device such as a smartphone. Yetisen wants to go beyond the limits of the wearable technology, which is when the Dermal Abyss Smart Tattoo Ink came out. Intelligent Tattoo Absorbent Dermal Abyss utilizes interstitial fluid to monitor the levels of substances in the body, indirectly recognizing the user's condition. This is a valuable part of a blood transfusion (no red blood cells, but full of glucose, sodium, fat, amino acids, hormones, etc.), extremely convenient for measuring Dermal Abyss tattoos without interfering with blood vessels. Currently, the laboratory has successfully tested pig skin in tattoos, turning from pink to purple when blood glucose levels rise, and another type of ink in tattoos becomes intensely blue as the amount of sodium increases. the body is dehydrated. Ms. Nan Jiang said tattoo ink technology still needs more time to study, such as to solve the problem of fading or scattering in the cuticle. However, both are optimistic that once completed, the Dermal Abyss project has great potential, such as permanent tattoos for chronic diseases (such as diabetes) or temporary tattoos used in a certain time. Another interesting possibility is that invisible tattoos appear only when exposed to light at a particular wavelength. Dermal Abyss tattoos also carry many practical applications from patients to athletes and even astronauts who need to be monitored for their health. But more than anything, Ms. Jiang expects the project to become an inspiration to both the artist and the scientific community about its potential, as well as open the community to discuss issues surrounding the technology, For example, if you want to publicize your health outside of your body. Source: The Harvard Gazette